Rape Aggression Defense Program

The Rape Aggression Defense Program is a program of realistic, self-defense tactics and techniques. The Department of Public Safety hosts these programs throughout the academic year. RAD is NOT a martial arts program. 

Our courses are taught by certified RAD instructors Officer Nicholas Greenway and Detective Sergeant Tim Jacobs.

The RAD System of Physical Defense is taught at many colleges and universities across the nation and has been offered at FSU for many years. The growing, widespread acceptance of this system is primarily due to the ease, simplicity and effectiveness of the tactics.

The RAD System is dedicated to teaching women defensive concepts and techniques against various types of assault, by utilizing easy, effective self-defense tactics. This system of realistic defense will provide a woman with the knowledge to make an educated decision about resistance. We operate on the premise that a spontaneous, violent attack will stimulate a natural desire to resist on the part of the victim, which is supported by research. We educate women about the Flight or Fight Syndrome, while showing them that enhancing their option of physical defense is not only prudent, but a necessity if natural resistance is to be effective.

Safety and survival in today's world requires a definite course of action. We provide effective options by teaching women to take an active role in their own self-defense and psychological well being.

UPCOMING CLASS:

 

Fall 2019 Semester - TBA
  • Twelve (12) Hours of COMMITTED time.
  • This program is FREE!
  • RAD programs are either:
    • Held once a week for three weeks during mornings or evenings;
    • Held during the weekend on a Friday/Saturday or Saturday/Sunday rotation.
  • Class size is limited to 20-25 participants. Subsequent classes may be scheduled to fit the demand for the program throughout the academic year.
  • The program is on a FIRST COME, FIRST SERVE basis. Prospective participants must sign up by contacting the department.
  • The class is open to female students, female faculty/staff and female members of the community.
  • All participants will be issued a RAD Manual for Reference and continuous personal growth.
  • Please contact Detective Sergeant Tim Jacobs, Officer Nick Greenway, or Dispatch Specialist Dylan Tantalo for more information. Contact information can be found here.

The following Crime Statistics have been obtained from www.rainn.org.

Sexual violence on campus is pervasive.

  • 11.2% of all students experience rape or sexual assault through physical force, violence, or incapacitation (among all graduate and undergraduate students).2
  • Among graduate and professional students, 8.8% of females and 2.2% of males experience rape or sexual assault through physical force, violence, or incapacitation.2
  • Among undergraduate students, 23.1% of females and 5.4% of males experience rape or sexual assault through physical force, violence, or incapacitation.2
  • 4.2% of students have experienced stalking since entering college.2

Student or not, college-age adults are at high risk for sexual violence.

  • Male college-aged students (18-24) are 78% more likely than non-students of the same age to be a victim of rape or sexual assault.1
  • Female college-aged students (18-24) are 20% less likely than non-students of the same age to be a victim of rape or sexual assault.1

Sexual Violence Is More Prevalent at College, Compared to Other Crimes

Graphic depicts statistic that college women are two times more likely to be sexually
                                          assaulted than robbed. Graph compares figures for college-age women and for all women.
                                          For all women, there are 5 robberies for every 4 sexual assaults. For college women,
                                          there are 2 sexual assaults for every 1 robbery.

  • About 1 in 6 college-aged female survivors received assistance from a victim services agency.2
  • 21% of TGQN (transgender, genderqueer, nonconforming) college students have been sexually assaulted, compared to 18% of non-TGQN females, and 4% of non-TGQN males.2

College-Age Victims of Sexual Violence Often Do Not Report to Law Enforcement

Infographic explaining reasons victims cited for not reporting a sexual assault or
                                          rape to police. For students who don't report, 26% believed it was a personal matter,
                                          20% had fear of reprisal, 12% believed it was not important enough to report, 10%
                                          did not want the perpetrator to get in trouble, 9% believed police would not or could
                                          not help, 4% reported but not to police, and 31% cited other reasons. For non-students
                                          who didn't report, 23% believed it was a personal matter, 20% feared reprisal, 19%
                                          thought it was not important enough to report, 14% didn't want the perpetrator to
                                          get in trouble, 10% believed the police would not or could not help, 5% reported but
                                          not to police, and 35% cited other reasons.

Because this study allowed victims to cite more than one reason for not reporting to law enforcement, this statistic may not total 100%. 
  • Only 20% of female student victims, age 18-24, report to law enforcement.1
  • Only 32% of nonstudent females the same age do make a report.1

Sexual Violence May Occur at a Higher Rate at Certain Times of the Year

  • More than 50% of college sexual assaults occur in either August, September, October, or November.4
  • Students are at an increased risk during the first few months of their first and second semesters in college.4

 


Campus Law Enforcement Has a Significant Role in Addressing and Responding to College Sexual Assault

  • 86% of sworn campus law enforcement officials have legal authority to make an arrest outside of the campus grounds.5
  • 86% of sworn campus law enforcement agencies have a staff member responsible for rape prevention programming.5
  • 70% of campus law enforcement agencies have memorandums of understanding (MOUs) with local law enforcement.5
  • 72% of campus law enforcement agencies have a staff member responsible for survivor response and assistance.5
  • Among 4-year academic institutions with 2,500 students or more, 75% employ armed officers, a 10% increase in the last decade.5

Sources:

  1. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics,  Rape and Sexual Victimization Among College-Aged Females, 1995-2013 (2014).
  2.  David Cantor, Bonnie Fisher, Susan Chibnall, Reanna Townsend, et. al. Association of American Universities (AAU), Report on the AAU Campus Climate Survey on Sexual Assault and Sexual Misconduct (September 21, 2015). ("Victim services agency” is defined in this study as a “public or privately funded organization that provides victims with support and services to aid their recovery, offer protection, guide them through the criminal justice process, and assist with obtaining restitution.” RAINN presents this data for educational purposes only, and strongly recommends using the citations to review any and all sources for more information and detail.)
  3. i. National Crime Victimization Survey, 1995-2013 (2015); ii. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Rape and Sexual Victimization Among College-Aged Females, 1995-2013 (2014). 
  4. Campus Sexual Assault Study, 2007; Matthew Kimble, Andrada Neacsiu, et. Al, Risk of Unwanted Sex for College Women: Evidence for a Red Zone, Journal of American College Health (2008). 
  5. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Campus Law Enforcement, 2011-2012 (2015).

1. Do you need any prior experience to attend this class? Do I need to be in top physical shape to participate?

No. This program is designed for the average person with no previous experience or background in physical skills training.


 2. What is the cost of a basic program?

Ferris State University offers this program FREE OF CHARGE. Other areas may incur a cost to participants. 


3. Is this program one person's opinion?

The RAD program as it appears today is a result of the contributions of many RAD instructors across the United States and Canada. 


4. How many women have taken this program?

To date, over 900,000 women have attended RAD Basic Physical Defense Program nationwide. At Ferris State University, over 500 women have participated in the program!


5. How long is this program?

The program typically runs two, six-hour days. 


 6. Do I need to purchase a textbook?

No, materials are provided to you. 


 7. Why is the class not offered to males?

The women's course has techniques geared specifically for women to defend against predators. Many of the techniques are taught on the elements of distraction and surprise, which if known to predators, would decrease the effectiveness of the program. 

The RAD program offers a men's self-defense course. More information can be found by visiting the national RAD website at http://www.rad-systems.com/rad_men.html