Faculty Research Fellows

2014 (from Jan 2014- Dec 2014)

_____________________________________

 

John Scott Gray

 Department of Humanities

 College of Arts and Sciences

 Project:  Errors of Proportionality

 Description:

 Jon Stewart recently discussed how in the United States there have been only 3,500 deaths since the 1970s due to acts of terrorism, but almost a million deaths due to gun violence. Yet, in our public consciousness acts of terrorism seem to far outreach gun violence in terms of public angst, fear, and demand for action. We have in several ways acted to limit our constitutional rights after 9-11 and the recent Boston Bombing in response to terrorism, yet little or no progress can be made on gun control. The 24 hour news cycle formulates our thinking about the relative severity of news events, yet editorial decisions center around ratings rather than the public good. I will examine the separation between what is taught in journalism programs and actual practice, as well as the idea of immediacy as presented in social psychology.

___________________________________

 

J. Randall Groves

Department of Humanities

College of Arts and Sciences

Project:  The Contingency of History: A Dynamic and Comparative Perspective.

Description:

I will continue work on my book Comparative Civilization and the Contingency of History and writing articles and conference presentations on the ideas that are covered in the book. I argue that world history displays patterns, but that these patterns are not necessarily deterministic, but contingent. I describe each of four key civilizations, the West, Indic Culture, Sinic Culture and Islamic Culture, and try to indicate the essential similarities and differences between these civilizations.

_____________________________________

 

James D. Hoerter

Department of Biological Sciences

College of Arts and Sciences

Project:  Melanoma and Solar UV A Radiation

Description:

Sunlight ultraviolet radiation (UV) is the prominent environmental physical carcinogen known to be involved in melanoma, the most deadly form of human skin cancer. The central hypothesis of our research is that the more penetrating UV A radiation reaches the dermal layer of the skin and causes mutations that contribute to the early stages of melanoma. Melanocytes regenerated from altered stem cells may be more vulnerable to the less penetrating, but more damaging, UVB radiation. The results of this research will help to identify the earliest cellular origin of melanoma, and determine if UV A radiation plays an important role in this process. It will also develop a model for producing cancer stem cells in situ from adult stem cells, making a significant contribution toward understanding how cancer stem cells are produced and how they might be most effectively destroyed within a tumor using drug therapy.

_____________________________________

 

Arinze Nkemdirim Okere

Department of Pharmacy Practice

College of Pharmacy

Project:  Conduct a pilot study on the use of alpha lipoic acid for the treatment and prevention of diabetic retinopathy.

Description:

Increased production of free radicals and depletion of antioxidants are commonly observed in diabetic patients. Based on animal studies, increased production of free radicals tends to persist even after blood glucose is tightly controlled. The rationale of using a potent antioxidant is based on the observation that increased oxidative stress associated with hyperglycemia can contribute to cellular injury leading to apoptosis; consequently, leading to diabetic retinopathy. Evidence from animal model showed that alpha lipoic acid (a potent antioxidant) was effective for decreasing the progression of diabetic retinopathy and in reducing free radicals. Therefore, we hypothesize that therapy that can exert a powerful antioxidant activity can provide a therapeutic modality needed to target the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy.

 

 

2013 (from Jan 2013- Dec 2013)

Dan Adsmond
Professor of Chemistry
Project: Determination and analysis of crystal packing in cocrystals incorporating the antibacterial drug, sulfamethazine, and a carboxylic acid

Rachel Foulk
Assistant Professor of Art History
Project: A Walk Through the Seasons: The Esquiline Landscape Calendar and the Representation of Time in Imperial Rome

Randy Groves
Professor of Philosophy
Project: Comparative Civilization and World History: A Theory of Cultural Change.

Bakhodirzhon Siddikov
Professor of Mathematics
Project: Magnetic Refrigeration: Improved Approximation Function for the Heat Capacity of Gadolinium